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Comments

  • Mittz

    Mittz

    March 10, 2015, 11:55 am

    For all post production I use Final Cut Studio and After Effects.

    As for camera. I use/have used different camera's for different stories. 8mm is awesome and fairly cheap. 16mm is way cool, but I don't really have enough money to shoot much on it.

    I use digital a lot because its the cheapest and widely accepted everywhere. With next film I'm shooting on 2x Panasonic HPX 502. My latest favorite 'cheap' set up has to be a HVX202 with a 35mm lens adapter on it.

    I haven't put any of my stuff online. Youtube's become crap, and I haven't set up a Vimeo accounts yet.

    Reply

  • MrCda

    MrCda

    March 10, 2015, 3:51 pm

    So you are against the existing RIDE program approach, never mind this proposed law.

    The argument would be that when a policeman watches 50 cars drive down the road, it's not apparent which one might have an impaired driver unless the driver is very drunk. It's usually the reaction time to unexpected events (a kid running out on the road, a cyclist steering around a sewer cover) where an impaired driver's slowed reaction time would tell. RIDE program proponents argue that waiting until such an unexpected event occurs is too late.

    So then the question is: do the benefits of the existing RIDE program which tries to find those drivers with slowed reaction times (but who aren't visibly swerving) outweigh the costs to individual freedom?

    Edit: RIDE is a program in Ontario (my mistake for using the term freely). It's been around for 20+ years. Police stop motorists and ask questions to determine if the driver appears sober. If the officer has suspicions, then they request that you take a breathalyzer. Thanks to Reliant for pointing this out.

    Reply

  • live52

    live52

    March 10, 2015, 2:25 pm

    You're right and I will admit straight out that I took that from memory, in the heat of a reddit moment. So here's one version of the exchange:

    WILLARD

    "Who's the commanding officer here ?"

    SOLDIER

    "Ain't you ?

    You think you're bad...

    Go get the Roach, man ! Get Roach !"

    SOLDIER

    "He's down by the wire. You need a flare ?"

    ROACH

    "No. He's close, man. He's real close...

    Motherfucker."

    WILLARD

    "Hey, soldier. Do you know who's in

    command here?"

    ROACH

    "Yeah...."

    Reply

  • matts2

    matts2

    March 10, 2015, 11:10 pm

    He wants to allow those laws to be enforced. I gave you the link, read it. It is only a few lines of relevant material. In fact, here they are:

    > The Supreme Court of the United States and each Federal court--

    > (1) shall not adjudicate--

    > (A) any claim involving the laws, regulations, or policies of any State or unit of local government relating to the free exercise or establishment of religion;

    That's it. All of the federal court decisions banning school prayer go away and the state laws forcing it are enforceable again.

    Reply

  • dcatalyst

    dcatalyst

    March 10, 2015, 8:52 am

    > Rosie Dimanno is the reporter: [email protected]

    EDITORIAL/NEWSROOM

    Editor: Michael Cooke

    Managing Editor: Joe Hall

    The main newsroom phone number is 416-869-4300; fax 416-869-4328; email [email protected]

    General inquiries can be sent to:

    Editorial Department

    Toronto Star

    One Yonge Street, Fifth Floor

    Toronto, Ontario

    M5E 1E6

    You can reach individual departments/sections within Editorial via phone, fax or email, listed below

    Most staff members, including reporters, editors, columnists and photographers, can be reached by email. In most cases the email address follows this formula (all lower case, don't type spaces or the plus sign): first initial + last name @thestar.ca.

    You can also reach staff in the Editorial department (newsroom) via phone at 416-869-4300 or fax at 416-869-4328. Editorial staff members can also be contacted within the department they work for.

    Reply

  • cuppycakeofpain

    cuppycakeofpain

    March 11, 2015, 8:54 am

    First, you have to be inspired by something. The source of your inspiration really could be anything: a chunk of a lyric that pops into your head while you're folding your laundry, or a new musical instrument, or a genre of music you're liking at the moment. It doesn't really matter where it comes from, as long as you have a core of inspiration. The last thing people want to hear is a tired, lazy tune that's dragging its ass across the stage and knows it. You can apply fifty times the amount of craft and it might emerge as passable, but why bust your ass trying to polish a turd? Not too many of the truly great songs of our time have been potboilers. Only you know what inspires your inner songwriter, so I can't help you there, but I can suggest that you increase activities that inspire you.

    Next, consider your audience. This comes automatically for a lot of songwriters. If you're writing for an anarchist oi band, then you probably know your audience well and you're all set. If you usually write for said oi band and are commissioned to write a jingle for the AARP, then you might need to fine-tune your method and maybe even do a little research. People might tell you that treating a song you're writing like a product to market isn't artistically pure, but they're just jerking you around and lost in some grand bullshit delusion where art is exuded from the pores of an "artiste". Here in the real world, we know that every song has an intended audience, and the more you know about who you're speaking to, the easier the writing will be.

    Then, consider your method. Everybody has a different one. What you do now isn't working very well, so switch it up. It doesn't mean you suck, it just means that you have to re-tool things. There are two main approaches to songwriting, named the 'John' approach and the 'Paul' approach, for strange reasons nobody really understands. These two approaches make up the endpoints of a sliding scale, kind of like the scale from straight to gay, but with less self-doubt. The 'John' approach means you get the words and the message first, and then work out how it all fits into a song with chords and a tune. The 'Paul' approach means coming up with music, and then fitting some words to it. Nobody, not even John and Paul, fits exclusively and totally on one position on the scale. You'll fall somewhere in between and it will vary from song to song. There's also a third magical way, the 'Fairy Tale' approach, where the entire song springs, Athena-like, from your head. So it's not really an approach to songwriting so much as it is a divine miracle that only happens to the lucky and the geniuses.

    Finally, realize that the first version of a song isn't the song itself. It's like a trial run. You need to run it past people, because the way you approach a tune is clouded by all sorts of weird preconceptions, like the fact that you wrote the damn thing. Other people can give you an unbiased opinion and might see thing that you'd overlooked (overheard??). The fact that you have a collaborator is good, because you can bounce things off each other and there's another pair of ears to catch what you might have missed. A song is never really finished. Sure, you can commit a song to a medium and fix a *version* of it, but the tune lives on. That's why the great songs work no matter who records them (assuming that whoever does the recording has a little bit of talent). Genre, arrangement, and musicianship (above a certain baseline, below which the tune becomes unrecognizable) can't really add to or detract from a truly great song.

    Songwriting's a craft, but hopefully it's fun for you, too. If you're not having fun then it's going to be apparent in the finished product. Find out what works best, then rely on that for most of what you do, and let variations sneak in from time to time to spice things up and prevent your songwriting from growing stagnant.

    Reply

  • Dark-Star

    Dark-Star

    March 10, 2015, 8:19 am

    As crazy as that sounds...you wouldn't *believe* how much I've been cougarstalked in the last year while fixing computers for my fellow college students. Some of them are utterly clueless about technology, but some are willing to learn and very pleasant to talk to.

    If I had a decent job I *might* actively date one or two of them, but being free on only one day a week isn't a schedule any business will really consider hiring a person for. 8-p *EDIT: that means I'm unemployed, clueless people.*

    Reply

  • RedMarble

    RedMarble

    March 10, 2015, 10:31 am

    No, they aren't the same. It *does* matter whether you switch envelopes - there's a range of values for which you should switch, and a range of values for which you shouldn't. This depends on the distribution of values. "It doesn't matter if you switch envelopes or not" is a equivalent to claiming P[x] + Q[x] = 2P[x] + Q[x]/2, or P[x] = Q[x]/2. But this statement about the distribution of values *isn't necessarily true*, so it's invalid.

    The correct answer is "there is a strategy that will maximize the return, this strategy is a deterministic function of the value we see, but we aren't given enough information to know what the strategy is".

    Reply

  • geoman69

    geoman69

    March 11, 2015, 1:00 am

    Yup, it's a troll headline that seems to have hooked half of reddit.

    Here's what happened:

    * Guy gets arrested and charged with invitation to sexual touching of a minor (some of his students).

    >Every person who, for a sexual purpose, invites, counsels or incites a person under the age of fourteen years to touch, directly or indirectly, with a part of the body or with an object, the body of any person, including the body of the person who so invites, counsels or incites and the body of the person under the age of fourteen years, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years or is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

    * Toronto star erroneously reports that he's charged with sexual assault of a minor. It wasn't *sexual assault*, it was the above charge.

    * Guy jumps in front of a train.

    * Toronto star troll writes article pointing out that when people off themselves before the trial, we never find out if they're actually guilty or not, so she's going to assume that he is.

    * Reddit freaks out.

    Reply

  • sniles

    sniles

    March 10, 2015, 3:25 pm

    You're falling into the "worst thing we do" trap. There are things that are clearly torture, and things that are not (hopefully you can agree with that). A hot poker in the eyeball is definitely torture; allowed to hold a kitten (or not, if you don't like kittens) is not torture. Things in between those extremes become less black and white, and more grey. Invariably, as they become more grey, reasonable people will draw the line and not cross it. It will also be the case that some percentage of people will disagree with where that line is drawn. That is just reality.

    Would I yell at a person who knew where my child was being held for ransom? Yes. Would I put a hot poker through his eye to get him to tell me? No. Would I non-violently keep him awake past his bedtime? You bet.

    I've addressed mikelieman's absurd strawman, if you care to read it.

    Reply

  • blindsyde

    blindsyde

    March 10, 2015, 10:01 am

    I can't smell nor have I been able to my whole life either. The way I found out was when I was about 12 or 13, came home from school and someone had accidentally bumped the gas nob on our stove on. It had been on for several hours by the time I got home from school. I was at the table eating a sandwich when my mom came home and started freaking out as soon as she walked in the door. She grabbed me by the arm and told me to get out of the house. I had probably been home for about 10 minutes. She went back in the house, opened doors and windows and turned off the gas. Since then It's pretty much been the same argument that people don't believe me or say that I can't taste if I can't smell. I could be blindfolded and tell you exactly what I am eating. My friends and coworkers will always tell me to "Smell this" then say "Oh yeah, sorry". I never try to get away with wearing anything twice without washing it first. I don't think any of my other senses are heightened, but I do know I can drink alcohol with no problem. I have never smelled a fart, or a rose, or fresh coffee. To me, it's basically like inhaling different temperatures of air with various changes of humidity. I do think my taste buds are dulled because I like really tart/sour things (crisp green apples, key lime pie) and I tend to put Sriracha Hot Sauce (with Rooster on bottle) on everything. Apples, onions and potatoes and Jicama all taste different to me. Anyway, I've asked a lot of people about if there tend to be more good smells in life vs. bad, but they all would prefer to be able to smell. I don't feel like I'm missing out on too much

    Reply

  • matts2

    matts2

    March 10, 2015, 4:14 pm

    >I am not familiar with the We the People Act. Looking it over, it seems like it is an attempt to keep the overbearing Federal Government out of state matters.

    It is an attempt to override the 14th Amendment which guarantees all of us equal rights. It would say that the states can impose religion however they want. I see that as a major increase in government power.

    >Considering Article 1, Section 8 and the 10th Amendment covers this anyway, the act sounds like it is simply re-stating, for clarity, what is already in the Constitution.

    Why do libertarians insist that the 14th Amendment does not exist?

    Reply

  • nazihatinchimp

    nazihatinchimp

    March 11, 2015, 3:29 am

    I moved furniture for a living. I liked the variety as everyday I saw a different house but the work was really hard. Our estimators (we worked mainly in big houses for rich people) would tell them just to keep all non breakables in their dresser or amour to save them the money of moving more stuff. This was a nice thing to do but it made for some heavy ass carries. Just the sheer long hours of back breaking work made this job the worst. The boss was cool and bought the whole company lunch everyday.

    Also we would see some gross shit. I remember moving these gay guys out and their were used condoms all over the place. I don't hate on gay people but that was gross. I remember moving a bed in this teenagers room and their was a bottle of lotion and some tissues on the floor. I bet that was an awkward discovery for the mom or whoever found it.

    You'd be surprised how many people don't tip. They'll tip for delivering a pizza but not for delivering all the shit in your house.

    Reply

  • Throwawayname

    Throwawayname

    March 11, 2015, 1:35 am

    Copy of my e-mail to Rosie:

    Ms. Dimanno,

    Your first sentence of your article says enough – “David Dewees died an innocent man.” I think anyone aware of the circumstances surrounding his death would agree that it is tragic in all senses. However, your article, *Teacher’s suicide a sad tale to the end*, shows absolutely no tact and is reprehensible for it’s tabloid style journalism. Sensationalistic writing and questionable tactics such as

    “But was it guilt of another kind, shame and self-loathing, that made the 32-year-old lie down on the tracks at High Park subway station Saturday morning rather than face trial?

    “But if Dewees really did lie prone on the rails and wait for an oncoming train to mangle his body, condemning himself to those moments of terrifying anticipation, then he embraced a worse comeuppance than any retribution the courts could impose. This was a ritualistic punishment, a self-mutilation.”

    “Our law affords no protection from libel to the dead. So we will assume by his actions, and for the purpose of exploring this awful event, that Dewees was guilty as charged;”

    “The distinction is important though it's doubtful – this too can never be ascertained”

    “There's little Dewees could have done to alter his thoughts. While it may be a perversion, fantasizing about sex with children isn't a crime. But acting on those urges is (despite a small constituency of deviants that seeks to take the moral sting out of "intergenerational sex"), even to the extent of owning child pornography.”

    and

    “If Dewees was aroused by boys, prudence demanded he put himself far from temptation, although there's really no such thing as safe distance in an online universe. Yet he taught pubescent boys and volunteered at a youth camp. He was a figure of trust and authority. That was his betrayal.”

    is the type of tabloid drivel that brings shame on an otherwise reputable paper. You mentioned yourself the man’s reputation is in tatters (in part by your own reporting), but you are sanctimonious enough to presume that it was his guilt, not his tarnished character, that drove him to suicide? Truly, this is the type of writing that would not be deserving a passing grade in college journalism courses, much less be published in the newspaper of a major city.

    Ms. Dimanno, I am writing you to give you a chance to explain your behavior and apologize for your article. It crossed too many lines for a man who should be presumed innocent. As a contributor to his tarnished reputation, perhaps an article is due which leaps to tremendous conclusions about the influence you had in this man’s life, and perhaps even assumes your guilt as a contributor in his death. However, that would be too juvenile and unprofessional for any dignified writer.

    Reply

  • bbrizzi

    bbrizzi

    March 10, 2015, 10:59 am

    I guess you don't know what digital means. It doesn't mean it's stored on a hard drive.

    From Wikipedia:

    >A digital system is a data technology that uses discrete (discontinuous) values. By contrast, non-digital (or analog) systems use a continuous range of values to represent information. Although digital representations are discrete, the information represented can be either discrete, such as numbers, letters or icons, or continuous, such as sounds, images, and other measurements of continuous systems.

    So CDs are digital. They use bits. A CD runs at 44100 bits per second.

    Reply

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